About your Search

20121201
20121231
STATION
CSPAN 267
LANGUAGE
English 267
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 267
. there is no death, just transformation. may they rest in peace. let us say amen. >> please be seated. >> let us unite our hearts in prayer. >> oh god of love and mercy, we come before you this night with broken hearts. we offer you our tears and our pain, our anger and our sorrow. oh lord there was a hole so large we wonder if even you in your greatness can fill it it as we grieve and fourn for those who are lost. each light that sits before us is a light that's been lost to our world. so many nnlt, so many breave. lord all we can do is throw ourselves upon your tender mercies trusting that you hear our prayers. we know those who are lost because their ours lord, not names on some list but our mothers or sisters, our brothers or friends, kindred all because if we did not know them ourselves we know someone who did. and so we pray, lord, for all the sowls lost and families and friends who are torn by grief. for in this moment we are all your children. a family related by your love. so help us to care for these families in their sorrow and for each other in ours. may they feel the healing embrace
the challenge for us is that we want to see on every device for every person -- we are a mobile society. the challenge is to make sure that we are on ipads, computers, phones, and traditional view reid on how wonderful high-definition television screen. the other challenge we have obviously is that spectrum is a finite resource. others what that resource. -- want that resource. there is not enough spectrum in the universe to do all video by broad bed. -- broadband. their system will always fail because of the congestion of transmitting video one-to-one. you cannot do that. >> the communicators continues its look at the future of television ad monday night with a gordon smith. >> president obama was in newtown, connecticut where he spoke at an interest -- an interfaith vigil to mourn the victims of the mass shooting at sandy hook elementary school. he met with members of the family and members of the police force. he spoke about the inspiration that the community had shown in the aftermath of the cap -- in the aftermath of the tragedy. other speakers at the service included the connectic
,200. that is not entitlements. that is what is owed to people who have worked all their lives. i think if these people put us over the cliff, it is treason. guest: i am not sure what numbers those are. host: it seems that his basic concern is that he would not get out of it when he has paid into it. guest: it depends on how long we live in our life span. on the average, the system is designed that you get out what you pay into it. i guess i would say that the numbers vary for every individual in what they are paying nothing get out. for what it is worth, with the caller is talking about, social security sends the form out every year and tells you how much you have paid into the system per year and it goes back through your work history and it tells you what your expected benefits are. you can do the same calculations the caller is doing. host: we have this week. hasn't republican party the would ask policies from reagan shifted to lower income working people? -- republican party policies shifted to lower income working people having the burden? guest: working people pay an extraordinary percentage of the inc
of electricity they use. some use as much electricity as a medium-sized town. it is a very secretive industry. they tend to be hiding in plain sight. littlees you'll see diesel generators on the side. those are backup power supplies. and it is a data center. >> were those located at the road they're all over the place. they're in high rises in cities, in greenfield sites out in suburban areas, there tucked away in the back of offices. they are the way that most commerce takes place now. everyone has to have one. there are concentrations of the in the country. northern virginia, silicon valley. they're everywhere at this point. >> who runs them? >> a variety of players. companies that need these for their regular business owns some of these data centers, everything from walmart to microsoft. there is also a culture or commerce of renting space in dissenters. those are lesser-known names. one of them will sell you time on servers or space on servers. >> mr. glanz, what is contained inside these warehouse buildings? >> they're fairly boring places to visit. they are stacked with these modular co
and prepared them for use in aerial bombs. these reports suggests that assad's forces are waiting for orders. if true, these reports may mean that the united states and our allies are facing the prospect of use of weapons of mass destruction in syria and this may be the last warning we get. time for talking about what to do may now be coming to a close and we may be left with an awful and very difficult decision. whether to continue on the said lines and hope that a man who has slaughtered nearly 40,000 men, women and children in syria will decide not to take the next step and use far more destructive weapons to kill significantly larger numbers of people, whether to take military action of some kind that could prevent a mass atrocity. if that is the choice we now face, it is a grave and sobering decision and would put the starkest expression on the failure of the administration's policy towards syria. savage and unfair fight, this raged now for nearly two years. the longer this conflict has gone, the worse it has gotten. all of those who argued for non intervention because of the things tha
the justice component of many of these islamist parties. this is a response today corruption of these u.s.- sponsored regimes. -- to the corruption of these u.s.-sponsored regimes. for the record, i am against corruption. >> it goes back to the point at bottom made in my remarks that islamists did not win, the non- islamists lost. they lose by screwing up the delivery of services, by being so corrupt, by being ossified. islamists are there, waiting to take advantage of whatever opportunity, through violence or nonviolence. we did not even discuss their relationship with violence and nonviolence, which is a very important issue. they are there like vultures to reap the benefits, the carrion of these regimes. we can build, and we can help them, help the alternatives build better alternatives. >> question in the far corner over there. >> i am with the center for national policy. thank you for the debate. my point here is that there's been a suggestion that once islamists come to power, they will not give up power. i hear going to have some sort of a renewed dictatorship in the middle east. g
. john's church. >> let us bow our heads in prayer. let us pray. gracious god who has blessed us with this good land for our heritage, we pray that we may always prove ourselves to be a people mindful of your favor and glad to do your will. we pray that you will save us from violence, discord and confusion, from pride, arrogance and fear of each other, defend our liberties and fashion into one nite people the multitudes brought here out of many nations and languages. we pray that you will shower with your life giving spirit those to whom we have entrusted the authority of our government, that there may be justice and peace at home and that we may be a plessing to all the nations of the world. in the time of pross terty, fill our parties with thankfulness and in the day of trouble let us not lose our trust in you. let this national tree be a reminder that in some inexplicable way you are standing with us at all times. all this we ask in your most holy name, amen. >> good evening. on behalf of the national park foundation and national park service it is a great privilege to present
. if there is no further business to come before us, i wish to recognize dodi allen for the purpose of making a motion to adjourn. >> [inaudible] >> recognizing john abernathy -- don abernathy for the purpose of a second. >> [inaudible] >> all those in favor of adjournment, say aye. >> aye. >> i now turn it over to our distinguished secretary of state, alain marshall. >> thank you for a job well done. ladies and gentlemen, thank you for your service today. i want to thank the participants as well as those of you here to watch history being made. history in this historical room and people watching us across the state through modern technology, this is truly a moment to reflect upon what good citizenship is all about. before everybody does start to leave, let me remind the electorates, if i can ask you to return to your seat so we can pass those extra five. they are crucial and have to be sent to washington post case for archives and congress and everywhere else -- posthaste for our cars and congress and everyone else. thank you very much to everyone. i hope you have enjoyed yourself, making history, as
're not just a bureaucratic agency. we have sensitivity. we have people who work for us who are supposed to be there helping protect these people. it really broke through new ground for us. >> let's take another question -- it is great to have these kind of specifics. go ahead and identify yourself -- >> i am an international baccalaureate. thank you for your comments and you have a lot of wisdom and forgiving as a glimpse into the human side of things. with as many women who have reached panicles of their career and for those like yourself, is there a new path beyond that? once you reach the pinnacle, what can we expect to see of women who have accomplished a lot? do you retire into personal life or is that there are some other pathway once they leave their position? >> what are you going to do next? >> the women i have come across have -- who have also reached those high platitudes, they continue to be active, for the most part. i think this new environment, be it political or social environment has changed. people want to do more. sometimes people will do it as volunteers. want to be
us this gregory of the center for democracy and technology. what is the current law when it comes to law enforcement and e- mails and cell phones? >> the short answer is that it is confused. for e-mail that is less than 180 days old, law makers need a warrant. for more than 180 days, it is just a subpoenas of there is no judicial intervention or high standard of proof. for documents to store in the clouds, that is also available with a subpoena. with cell phones there is the statutory provision. this has been in different places. they need a warrant. others say if it is gps location they need a warrant. there is not a clear role. >> what are the changes that the senate judiciary committee has approved? >> they focused on content of communications. they said it should not matter how old the content is. it should matter how you started with a service provider or that one. they said there should be a warrant required. they maintain the existing exceptions to the requirement in current law. if there is this, they are able to get a voluntary disclosure from the provider right away. >>
in used for different amounts of time. and i have calculated the average duration of servitude based on the different categories, because they are different. again, speak to the importance of doing actual data gathering. you can see that the circumstances get shorter and you can extrapolate a sense in a given year, how many people were in bondage. so, that is one way of going about it. another is to multiplied out and say at this point in time, people are coming in and out. at event -- at any given time, you would have this many. ilo, their number is from your a to your be, there were -- from year a to year b, there were x numbers of slaves in the world. is just a different way of doing mouth. >> thank you for that brilliant, moving keynote address. it is what that conference desperately needed. make no apologies for crunching numbers. i know you are not apologizing. do not get depressed. we will solve all your questions in the next session. if not that one, surely the afternoon session. there is coffee upstairs. we want you back in 10, maximum 15 minutes. thank you very much. [appla
in such a moment of heartbreak all of us here in newtown. we gather especially mindful of family and friends and neighbors among us. who have lost loved ones by an act of unfathomable violence and destruction. would gather to grieve together, -- we gather to grieve together, to care for one another, to weep and to remember, and to declare in our many voices that the darkest days of our community shall not be the final word heard from us. we will sigh in our sorrorws. we will care for one another with our love and our compassion. in those early hours of the crisis, it became clear to we clergy and faith leaders here in newtown that an initial community response would be needed, that we would need to come together. and so we asked our first select woman and superintendent if it might be possible for the clergy to gather the community here at newtown high school, to continue and to begin what will be for many along journey through grief and loss. -- a long journey. we are not here to ignore our differences or diminish our core beliefs, which define our many different faith traditions, but to o
this legislation helps us keep pace. and very importantly. the legislation also allows the rewards program to target those wanted for genocide, to target those wanted for war crimes, for crimes against humanity, again, the world's human worst human rights abusers. it would be killers and the top commanders of the lord's resistance army. this group has terrorized across central africa for over two decades unspeakable crimes committed against children, amputations committed against children, taking child soldiers, taking sex slaves. in accordance with u.s. policy, a small team of u.s. troops are currently in the field helping local forces hunt this killer. . they believe an effort to could help bholser their efforts, they are asking for this, they think this can make a difference on the ground. let's answer their call and send this bill to the president for his signature and i thank my colleagues for their support. the speaker pro tempore: the gentlelady reserves her time they have gentleman from california is recognized. mr. berman: yes, mr. speaker, i have no further requests for time and
and credit practices. he has used his seat on the house agricultural committee and house financial services committee to help the most vulnerable americans. he has consistently played a role in raising funding levels for food stamps and nutrition programs to feed over 44 million hungry americans. he was a powerful voice against anti-immigrant laws and built bridges on the history of our nation. we will miss his principal leadership and his passion for serving as a voice for the voiceless in congress. and my fellow congressional black caucus member, laura richardson, she has many accomplishments during her brief time. she has worked hard to improve our nation's infrastructure and been advocate for inclusion of minority and women-owned businesses and opened up economic opportunities and strengthened our schools. i know she is going to move forward to make more contributions in public service because she is focused and dedicated elected official. i have to pay tribute to my sister, lynn woolsey and i can't say what a bittersweet season this is after seeing you work so many issues. lynn woolsey
when he has a gun it is a huge responsibility. if you use the weapon irresponsible plea -- irresponsibly, you could cause yourself trouble off, death even to people that you did not intend to do harm to. it makes you very careful. or it should make you very careful. for most people it does. it would make people more careful if they all had to pass some kind of a test before they get a license. you did not always have to with a gun in many localities. >> craig whitney on the history of gun ownership and gun control in america. and from living with guns, a liberal pays for the second amendment. saturday night at 10:00 eastern. part of four days of non-fiction books and authors through christmas days. as the electoral college met monday, we spoke with a social studies teacher at pioneer high school in ann arbor, mich., about how she teaches the look for a process in use the c-span as a resource. >> tracie van newsom is a high school and social studies teacher. >> tracy is a high-school social studies and history teacher. fellow, and she is joining us on the phone. what is y
and useful in that regard? >> yes, the lenders have found a useful. that has to be the way in which we judge them. when does depend on this course and the mortgage industry it depends on a specific score or a specific set of scores. we do find increasingly that in the auto industry and the credit-card industry that lenders use multiple scores when they do underwriting decisions. it would not rely on just a single score. they are increasingly looking for other information in the credit reports. they are laid on top of the original score and the original credit report that would be called as part of the application to make a determination about whether to accept a application and how to price the account. >> having a predictor of how they will handle their assets -- it is an asset especially to people who keep their credit and good shape. would that be true or false? what's it certainly helps people who keep their credit in good shape and where it is reported accurately. one of the concerns that we need to be aware of a in of the building of credit is the impact that the very first credit line
the people back home in just about every district keep asking us why it is that we can't get anything done here. well, i'm a newcomer. i've only been here about five months, and i know what is going on in terms of the political gamesmanship. this is an issue on which political games have to stop. we should have members of the republican caucus standing with us today and i hope in time we will. this has to be a bipartisan issue in the end. and so, as i have looked at what happened over the last two years, over 20 mass shootings and vitually every one of them has two things in common. the killer, the shooter used high capacity magazines and/or assault weapons to kill he is victims. and the second is almost every one of those individuals was either later or previously diagnosed with a serious mental illness that had been untreated. now i will quickly note that 95% of people with mental illness never commit a violent act. in fact, they are more likely to be victims themselves. but for that small number who might be prone to violence, we have to do something to increase awareness and treatment.
in the region, the regional leaders, people inside syria who are calling for more u.s. involvement and activity. there's an expectation that after the election the obama administration would take the wondering- we're all and waiting to see what is going to be. >> thanks to both of you for your questions. [captioning performed by national captioning institute] [captions copyright national cable satellite corp. 2012] >> if you work for them, you get a mercurial, sometimes j generous, almost cruel boss. he did not know how to apologize. men of his age and class are not going to apologize to a young secretary our typist. he had a way of turning the tables. his version of apology would be to say, i am a kind man and you're doing a good job today. the issue is never settled. he always had to get the last word in. one night going through white hall, a german bomb fell nearby. his bodyguard pushed him into a doorway. a couple of thompson's men were slightly wounded. churchill did not like to be touched. he said, thompson, do not do that. tonight, and extended 90 minute q&a with paul reid. "the last lio
comments or observations to like to share with us? >> i would just like to say very briefly -- and we launched large-scale processing of the iraqi program in 2007, we recognized the compelling humanitarian need, but at the same time, we recognized in anticipation that the actors would try to take advantage of any immigration program to the u.s., whether it is a vis the program are refugee program for student visitor program. we have striven over the years to be in the forefront of cooperation and collaboration with law enforcement and national intelligence communities. we know that the program is impervious, and we have tried our best to be forward leaning and ready to innovate and to learn from our experience in order to adopt the best protocols that we can. >> dilma. any closing comment? >> a brief one. thank you for your interest in the security screening process is. i would also like to say that the security screening process not only protect the u.s. but also the program and allows this country to provide ongoing protection to refugees who are in need. we thank you for your inter
are not in a position to be held hostage by anybody. it also focuses on find more and use less. what we can do in the federal government is i think invest in research and getting a 500-mile battery for electric cars and getting solar energy that is 1 kilowatt installed and finding a way to capture carbon from coal plants that can be turned into fuel that is commercially sold. we should look at the model of unconventional gas in terms of how our system and federal research and our system of private properties have produced a situation where we have a massive advantage over europe and asia in terms of our natural gas. it creates a better economy and that reduces the debt. >> there is a headline predicting we will be producing more oil than saudi arabia beginning in 2020. this is something almost on imagined 10 years ago. -- unimagined 10 years ago. what is the role of the federal government? >> to do things that encouraged the results. to follow up on the fiscal cliff. you can solve this fiscal problem if you grow our role to position relative to everybody else's. a big problem is the percentage
like him." he made me think, reflect, and laugh. i think all of us would say the same thing about warren today. he made us think, reflect, and laugh. one final thing about his humor -- senator baker was here today. both warren and i voted for a bill. i received a great deal of hate mail because of my name. i'm half irish and half jewish. i am the only one who can be put on the israeli border and be shot from both sides. [laughter] i was getting all of the hate mail and warren was not getting any of them. i will broadcast nationwide that you are jewish and i am not. that way you will get all of the hate mail. he said, do not do that. you are much more politically secure than i am. besides, you would make a nice jewish boy. [laughter] let me conclude with what my favorite statements -- with one of my favorite statements. it sums up my feelings about warren. "through our great fortune, in our youth our hearts were touched with fire. it is given to us to learn at the outset that life is a profound and passionate thing." do not pretend to undervalue the rewards of ambition. we have see
and one of the underserved policy topics in the united states. the native-born population of the u.s. doesn't have replacement fertility rates so all future population growths comes from what we choose and this is the issue over the longer term, so those things strike me as central as to how it will work out. seems to me we have a couple things. first is to recognize it is time to look forward. this crisis began years ago now, and i was once in the camp of designing very clever policies, i promise you they were very clever. al solved all these problems, but more policy and inknow vacation and programs and intervention i think is now making it too difficult to figure out what the rules are and move forward. more policy innovation. that is making it difficult to figure out what the rules are. it is time to let markets clear. that's point number one. the example is the basil three zero courts and the implementation. if you look at the credit implications of those rules verses normal lending circa 2001. we're on track to thrive for 25% fewer mortgages then if we have the standard for 200
at theatlantic.com. thanks for joining us. we will take you live to the house floor. [captioning performed by national captioning institute] [captions copyright national cable satellite corp. 2012] the speaker pro tempore: the house will be in order. the chair lays before the house a communication from the speaker. the clerk: the speaker's room, washington, d.c., december 19, 2012. i hereby appoint the honorable daniel webster to act as speaker pro tempore on this day. signed, john a. boehner, speaker of the house of representatives. the speaker pro tempore: the chair will receive a message. the messenger: mr. speaker, a message from the senate. the secretary: mr. speaker. the speaker pro tempore: madam secretary. the secretary: i have been directed by the senate to inform the house that the senate has agreed to s. res. 624, relative to the death of the honorable daniel k. inouye, senator from the state of ohio. -- hawaii. the speaker pro tempore: pursuant to the order of the house of january 17, 2012, the chair will now recognize members from lists submitted by the majority and minority l
at the whole statement of his, and to use that as an excuse for this bill -- by the way, at 97% of small businesses have in come under $250,000. so to use that once again as the rationale is i think ignorant of the fact. let me just say a word about the provisions on earned income tax and the child tax credits. you can play around with language, whether it is a tax or spending, but the truth of the matter is that the bill that was filed last night would raise taxes on 25 million working families. >> i just cannot believe that. this is the joint committee on taxation that says the provisions are spent. these are spending provisions, not tax provisions. this is not a tax increase. i will just then by the joint committee on tax reform. >> i have enjoyed the discussion to between the chairman and ranking member. is it a fact that when you make these tax cuts permanent for people making a million dollars or more, then you are at the same time, 9099000 for example, you are giving that person of $50,000 tax cut. >> about understood correctly what your asking, we are si on in, over 1 million, bu
memorial, lieutenant-general mckiliter. >> good afternoon. thank you for joining us as it -- as we commemorate the 71st anniversary of the attack on pearl harbor and the beginning of world war ii. we want to welcome our distinguished guests today, admiral james winnefeld, our keynote speaker. we are also honored to have with us general px kelly, chairman of the american battle monuments commission who played a role in establishing this special monument. [applause] it is always good to have superintendent bill vogel, our cost for this to work together. also the director of the bell "honor flight" -- the film "honor flight." there are many other distinguished guests to give a welcome to our honored guests, the pearl harbor survivors and all of our world war ii veterans and your families. and a very warm welcome to all veterans and their families with us. a special thank you to those serving in our armed forces and their families. what a magnificent job they have done in iraq and are doing in afghanistan. their performance of duty has been magnificent. we cannot say enough about those
and resolve to stand no matter the cost. made those brave souls who still remain here with us feel today your hand of strength. for those who remained with us today, received renewed hope and awareness of our gratitude for their bravery and sacrifice. we asked for york and seizing grace and bountiful blessings on them -- your unceasing grace and bountiful blessings on them. as we forge forward, committed to building superlative global unity and peace. amen. >> ladies and gentlemen, please be seated. >> our first speaker today is represent as the co-host for today's ceremony for the nationals -- national parks service, mr. robert vogel, superintendent of the national memorial parks. [applause] >> good afternoon. on behalf of the national parks service, it is my pleasure to welcome you to the world war ii memorial, which is dedicated to the valiant soldiers, sailors, airmen, and marines who fought in that war. as the superintendent of the national mall and memorial park, i have the true honor of serving as the custodian of this memorial. also ensuring that the story of the brave men and women w
what we might see in the years to come. let us start by going back a few centuries to a phenomenon all of you will most likely be familiar with. that is of course the north atlantic slave trade. i spent some time in nigeria documenting victims of human trafficking, challenging and terrific scenarios. caught up in a culture of poverty, oppression, organized crime during -- crime. men, women, boys, and growth. i took a visit to a town about two hours west of the capital lagos. here the portuguese built 510 years ago when the first slave trading outpost on the west african coast. that is the building. obviously there is a different route on it. that is the same structure from five centuries ago. records show more than half a million west africans were brought into this building and then take it out to the beach where they were taken into large seafaring vessels and the course taken to the americas. more than half a million. it is important to note that just as many of not more people were taken the other way. the north atlantic trade in slaves get a lot of attention but the asia-pacific t
with a bipartisan vote. what other spending cuts would you propose? what has gotten us into this mess is people propose large numbers and never fell in the details. we have filled in the details of our first step. let them kill and the details of their first step on it attacks or the spending side. they have not done either so it is not much of an offer. >> what they did say, they did not include having the top two rates on the wealthiest americans which means their proposal, their $800 million goes right back to the middle class. it would have to the mortgage tax deductions, college deductions, charitable deductions, mortgage relief legislation that i have had in place to you don't have to pay taxes on a short sale. there is a whole range of things that you have to go to better back on the middle class. we're not going to do that. we've got to make sure that the wealthiest in this country help pay down this large deficit. >> will the democrats just wait? >> we have a lot of discussions going on in the senate and the various places. we know what the parameters are and the speaker knows what the
george w. bush signed into law. his wife, former first lady laura bush, is with us today, as is her predecessor, secretary of state hillary clinton. coming together in mutual respect, a step from the chambers where we passionately debate the issues of the day that has become almost second nature to us. but it is a blessing, and we will hear over and over during the course of this ceremony, aung san suu kyi has shown the world just how hard one it really is. on behalf of the congress, let me express how humble and honored we are by your presence here in the rotunda of the united states capitol. >> ladies and gentlemen, please stand for the presentation of the callers by the united states armed forces color guard, the singing of our national anthem, and the retiring of the colors. ♪ ♪ ♪ oh say can you see by the dawn's early light, what so proudly we hail at the twilight's last gleaming, whose broad stripes and bright stars, through the perilous fight, o'er the ramparts we watched were so gallantly streaming, and the rockets' red glare, the bombs bursting in air, i gave proof t
about in you're so vain and will you share that with us? >> i think it's warren beatty. >> and he says not. >> that's what my information was but again that information has not been updated for 40 years. [applause] >> now that that the turnpike extends past the city to the airport, any thoughts about revising the song? >> you mean the turnpike no longer ends in boston, it goes all the way to summer set, no. what town is the airport in? >> that's got a ring to it but it doesn't rhyme. that's the thing is the internal rhyme. that song has four rhyming schemes going at once. it's got to be boston unless they take it to aust tin texas. [applause] >> i want to thank all of you for joining us this afternoon. i want to remind you of our next lunch on december 18, we have leon panetta, i'm sure if you have some advice on how to stolve fiscal cliff i'm sure heed like to hear that. >> while you are writing your next song i'd like to present you with your coffee mug. it might give you some inspiration. >> thank you so much. [applause] >> i want to thank the national press club staff including the
on the skilled work force or how much there is a skill gap, i think this is a critical issue. i think that for us to have clear policies, we need to do a little better in clearly defining the challenge. first of all, i don't think there is any question that the main reason we are having higher unemployment right now is not structural. it is fundamentally cyclical, fundamentally the lack of demand that is still in our economy as we recover from the great recession. that said, that awareness, that recognition that ben bernanke and former cea sheriff lazar -- cea chair lazear should not undermine that we face temporary or futures skills gaps but there is three reasons we should be focused on this. number one, even the unemployment today that is fundamentally about cyclical demand can easily become the next structural skills problem of the future. we know that one of the challenges we face right now in our economy is not just lowering unemployment, but lower and long-term unemployment, and that if we allow regions of our fellow citizens to stay unemployed for year or two years or longer, we know from
to go to brazil six months ago, if you told me the u.s. had just run faster, -- grown faster, 2.7%, we're expecting the u.s. economy to grow to%. the reason i raise this is to go down there and talk to policy makers and business people. we could have more taxes here, more regulation there. a little more cost of labor here. and a fair amount of uncertainty and take on one of the great economic miracles. they understand this thing they have a great economy growing rapidly is fragile and requires government to facilitate rather than later uncertainty. that is almost like a test tube of forcing. we had a time in which we had a huge amount of uncertainty. comes from -- some comes from government action. we had an aggressive regulatory agenda. we have not made a certain investments we have made. you add that up and you have a period in which businesses are operating under huge weight. creates the conditions under which businesses can operate in intellectual freedom. among the things government can do is create the conditions under which cost [no audio] to allow businesses to innovate. >> one
praise you for men and women in his love for each other have given us children that we might guide and encourage them. we seek your wisdom as our administrators and educate tors continue to teach our children ways which will strengthen them to be productive and positive citizens of this world, to only bring good. we pray we pray this will soon be replaced with a culture of life that embraces every person with human dignity. we are brought to you tonight in our prayer, those who have been lost, those whose hearts are broken forever. we bring your 20 new stores in the heavens, 20 new state and angels. those who risked their lives every day, not counting the costs, and we bring to you those who guide, those who counsel, those who bless and embrace the confused and broken, and we bring to view ourselves are broken this, our questions, our doubts, and our anger in our hearts, and we pray for the peace, hope, and renewal of trust that can come only from a god who first conceived as in love and places and hands of compassion on our shoulders, even in these challenging times, so tonight in
't have to submit it to the pentagon unless i use classified information. so i avoided using any classified information but a lot of stuff was declassified right after the war. a lot of stuff was a matter of public record. so i had a great deal of material. the best thing i had was this, any war i ever fought most of instructions were sent by message back and forth. so you have hard copy record of every decision made. because of where we are today most of the orders and instructions are seventh back and forth by secured telephone. it became apparent that we're not going have a record of the decisions made unless we have a record ourselves. any time i had a conversation i wrote down what i said and what is being said to me. i had someone in there who would write down every time i made a decision and he would log it into a private journal that we kept of every decision that was happening during the war. if it had not been through that the book would not be written. >> where are those 3,000 pages? >> they are mine. they are my private property. >> what are you going to do with them?
. this bill allows us to have the resources we need to get more uninsured americans into the health-care system. it reduces costs and will make as a stronger nation. >> peter shumlin is joining us from vermont. thank you very much for being with us. >> thanks so much for having me. >> why did he decide to take this job? >> it is a fascinating question. they're going to start this cycle $30 million a behind were the republican governors association is. they have opportunities across the upper midwest and states like florida and on the west coast. the governor of arizona is not so convinced she% limited. she think she can run. sheikh -- she is a term limited. she thinks she can run. even some states in the south and along the atlantic coast. there are tons of opportunities for democrats. they are $30 million were the republicans governors association is. >> a lot of democratic senators are up for reelection. the pool of money will be pushed also for these governors races and more democratic than republican seat in the senate. >> there arare far more democrat of for reelection in 2014
a number of possibilities for us. how can we use these digital technologies and learn fm them to change education on our alone campus. what weighs will we see based on the experience of these mass courses. how can that transform in cambridge and boston. secondly, we see it as a way to get harvard ideas and harvard teaching out to a broader world and way to accumulate a lot of data that can be an extraordinary resource for anybody who like to use that material to ask questions about the nature of human learning and how it ought to be structured. on the point about spreading learning to the rest of the world, i have a very moving reaction to one bit of data. one of the pilot courses. when i was in india, i met with people in india who were wanting to interact with harvard. there is a need for engagement with our schools public health. we have enormous challenges in that area. i was talking to these individuals about what kind of courses we might involve them in. this online course that i described steele has overall more than 40,000 students and 9000 of them come from india. last january
shared with us at prayer breakfast. we don't quote what people say at that meeting but he talked about his feeling about war and his participation in it. it was one of the most moving presentations i think any of us had seen. and it was so well received by the people there t. truth is senator inouye did not like war. he hated war. he knew the drubblingtive power of war and how people suffered as a result of it. and he voted against a number of resolutions that would commit the united states to military action. but at the same time, there was no doubt based on his ranking and chairmanship over a period of years, decades e he was a person who always at bottom could be counted on to ensure that this nation was well defended, that we did not make mistakes. and he and senator ted stevens had a unique relationship. and when something really developed that was important for the defense department and it involved a danger to our government or could do damage to the department or they needed something really seriously needed it, often times in this government we can't respond and we don't respo
work them up into a frenzy about the threats of theocracy. you use the comparison of iran. good lord. we are so far from any possible menace of religious orthodoxy. try to have a prayer at a high- school football game in texas. there is zero grounds. i do not see it. nor do i think in the members of the religious right, and i know many of them, any desire to tyrannize. they went into politics because they felt they were attacked. they want to be left alone. [applause] >> i appreciate you as a voice of reason. [inaudible] my question is more about historical and interpretation. what do think it keeps us so deeply in our ongoing philosophy of what democracy should be? >> that is a separate question. there are two in my ignorance. the continental french enlightenment and the british enlightenment. they differ radically. the british enlightenment was empirical and temperate. the french enlightenment was severe. one gave rise to be glorious revolution and eventually the american revolution. the french enlightenment gave rise to the french revolution and a blood bath. this sounds like a ph
for stepping in on such short notice you published the seminal work study on the hockey stick. tell us what the hockey stick is. >> it is not a sport. it is a curve that my co- authors and i published a few years ago. we had eight century of widespread thermometers around the world. we had to turn to what we call proxy data. it is to piece together how the clement buried in the more distant past. while it was relatively warm about a thousand years ago, the recent warming exceeded anything we have seen in the last thousand years. and it was featured in the summary for policymakers in 2001. when it became an icon in climate change, we saw the need to try to discredit this graph. indeed they saw discrediting me as a way of trying to do that. many have been vilified for the work the bayh done. i was all -- the work that they have done. i was also vilified. i was a involuntary an accidental public figure. i was put in the limelight in the way that our detractors have tried to put me in the limelight. i will try to take a vantage of that. the book was part of my effort to do that. >> catherine, y
position it had to stake out. use it at the end there's a sentence saying, but we will talk or negotiate. nothing unusual here to me. i think right now they are doing what they have to do publicly. we do not know what those people in the room at the white house are going to say and that is the key. host: the speaker will attend this meeting. he said the house has passed legislation to avert the fiscal cliff. now the senate must act. senator reid said it is up to the house. explain what is going on. guest: i cannot read john boehner's mind. let's say the senate takes up something where you extend all the rates for a year but you increase the rates for people making $500,000. let's say that passes the senate. 75 votes. they sent it to the house. are republicans in the house going to be that obstinate if the senate sends that kind of signal? i do not think so. that is what a lot of us watch mitch mcconnell very closely. there are people in his caucus who early to vote for what i just said. can they get it on the floor and overcome the procedural hurdles? host: if nothing happens, what are w
was for heaven and for future sakes. let us stand adjourned. [applause] [captioning performed by the national captioning institute] [captions copyright national cable satellite corp. 2012] >> the house oversight committee held a committee on causes for rising autism right with testimonies. you can see that sunday, 10:30 a.m. >> washbourne went to harvard law school. he emigrated out west to illinois where the lead mine industry was in its heyday. he arrived after a month's journey by ship, by stagecoach, by train, and arrived in this muddy mining town, boarded himself in a log cabin, established a look -- law practice. he worked his way up and became a successful lawyer. he got involved politically, ran for congress. served for eight terms. he befriended abraham lincoln and you sillies s. gragrant. washbourne was a close confidante. after grant was elected president, he appointed washbou rne secretary of state. washbourne became ill. his family felt for his life -- there for his life. he submitted his resignation. grant accepted his resignation. over the next couple of months, he regained his
. it is a very complicated issue. it is very complex. it is something that many of us have been fighting in the particulars of this, and some in their personal lives, as well as official lives. this is a very high priority for us. because of it -- money. let's just take money out there on the side on those that would be opposed to gun safety. i did not heed hunters with the same brush. i think the assault weapon gives hunters a bad name, and that is undeserved. many of them think it should be banned. that is why i am so glad my consummate is taking the lead to make that distinction. the fact is that there was no prospects of success for the members to be here to continue to make the fight so when there was a prospect of the feds -- a prospect of success, but they would be here. the other then be cleared out by the nra on a boat that was not afford to come to call. >> one of my jobs as the democrat is chief deputy. we had to vote to pass sensible gun legislation through the house, but when the senate said they could not live with 60 votes, the leader made the decision that this really was
of representatives from another party creates an opportunity for us. we know that if my party have won everything, it would have been tough for us because the political attacks would have taken place from the other side of the aisle to take on entitlements reform. now that we have a president of one party in the house of representatives of another party, i believe we can tackle this issue. that is really what we desire. it is the right thing to do. we are in the midst of tough negotiations taking place between two people -- the president of the united states, barack obama, and the speaker of the house, john data. i want to express my appreciation -- and the speaker of the house, john boehner. i want to express my appreciation to my colleagues. i have served in the minority. it is challenging. it is not easy. we are 11 days away from going over the fiscal cliff. we feel strongly about the need of this institution to state its position on this. we heard the majority leader in the united states senate indicate that he does not want to bring up this measure if it passes the house of representatives.
for me to be here. i am sure that played a role. >> in your speech yesterday, you used the expression of the senate we efforts right yesterday, as the world's greatest deliberative body. do you think the public shares that perception? >> probably not. [laughter] we're efficient at producing results. -- deficient at producing results. what i also said yesterday was a there are problems here. the problems i believe are very clear is that we spend too much time trying to seek political advantage, too little time focused on solving the country's problems. i am sure that had a role in my decision as well. i really came here wanting to do big things. wanted to work on solving problems. there is been much less an emphasis on that lately and much more of an emphasis on how you get over on the other guy. i understand this is a team sport, a competitive environment we are in, but at the end of the day, if we're not solving problems, it is pretty of the. >> -- empty. >> can you trace the trajectory of the partisanship? >> i can see it very directly going back to 1994. newt gingrich, he had a vie
across the country. so each and every one of us here should look forward to the day with great interest and anticipation. the issues being debated today have been chosen by members of the youth parliament with the help of over a quarter of a million of your peers, and i think i'm right in saying and emphasizing of the five topics being debated, four were chosen by the public vote, and one by nyp themselves namely curriculum for life. today, of course, you debating whether to choosing the issue which you wish to have as your national campaign. this debate is one of the highlights of parliament week, and schools across the country have been taking part in create the debate, a project to encourage them to stage their own debates on the very issues which the u.k. yb are discussing in the combat. we know schools across the country are tuning in to watch and that is hugely welcome. just on process and housekeeping, let me say the following. first, nyp who wish to speak should stand in their place, or raise their hands if seated in a wheelchair. secondly, and most importantly, nyp should alway
from -- as he weifang, there used to be only certain judges that held a bachelor's degree. too often china's justice system falls short of the laws on the books, both in practice and spirit. corruption is widespread. collusion among police and prosecutors and judges is common. most critical, the fundamental question of judicial independence remains ever elusive. the most sensitive cases still remain within the party control. number 3, and finally, what will be the process for future collaboration for the united states and china? i hope this group can talk about it. we have such firepower in the united states with great universities, wonderful legal societies that are willing to share our society -- our lot -- our knowledge brown's rule of law. how do we pack its ongoing efforts -- around rule of law. how do we pack its ongoing efforts that will yield real benefits -- package ongoing efforts that will yield real benefits? each speaker will take 15 minutes for a presentation, after which we will have a conversation and use a few moments to open it up to the audience. it is a great hono
at the history of what has been done. there is a long history of using that debt limit as a moment to distract from the party in power. if we had an academic seminar on the impact of the that struggle and the fiscal policy, he would say that it was a negative thing. >> well, i have never until last year of august 2011, i have not seen any serious effort or serious threat made by the leadership of congress to refuse to give the secretary of treasury the ability to offer to meet obligations congress had adopted. i thought that was a new experience for us. it certainly was for me to see that happen. dr. zandi, you said you think that we need to repeal this law that tries to set a debt limit and concentrate more on taxing and spending policies that causes to raise the debt, as i understand? >> absolutely. it is a bad way to conduct policy. it is a problem. look at july and august of 2011. it was a mess. gdp downgraded the debt. it really had an impact. cbo is estimating the interest costs is costing us money. it is pretty clear that this is not going to get any better going forward. it will be wor
they are investing from pre-k through college. there will have more in china and any of them the entire u.s. work force. we're focused on a global economy. those from harvard are competing globally with students from china, germany, brazil. tavis that transform the way we think about education? do you think your role as straining american leaders? are you looking at attracting global leaders? >> there are so many questions. let me address a few of them. there are numerous kind of statistics that we have a preeminence of college graduates in our populations and levels of participation. we are losing this. we have once last three of the world's college graduates. that is an interesting illustration of a shift in the dynamism. i see this when i travel. a huge commitment to public resources. huge energy to enthusiasm of higher education. india wants 1500 new universities by 2020. alicia's in a meeting about hong kong this week. i learned that hong kong university is expanding undergraduate education from three years to four years because they think it is not giving students enough time. there are all
. to start us down the road of making our children safer by treating children's gun safety like their auto safety. all the air bags, anti-drunk driving campaigns, child seats, driver education, careful licensing, it slashed the accident rate but it didn't eliminate them altogether. we can't imagine a world without these protections for our families. let's see if we can imagine a world where our children are safer from gun violence. and then make it happen. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman yields. the chair recognizes the gentleman from pennsylvania, mr. murphy, for five minutes. mr. murphy: madam speaker, i rise today with a heavy heart, to honor petty officer nicholas , a person who sacrificed his life in the most honorable of ways, to protect and save the life of another human being. his life was a testament to the core values of the united states navy, honor, courage and commitment. on december 9, twelve, pet -- 2012, the petty officer rescued ar kidnapped american doctor from the taliban near kabul. a veteran of the iraq war and a decorated navy seal, the petty officer died durin
with the u.s. think you, i yield back. >> mr. affleck, i think you have raised a central issue, the lack of security among the population. right now we are relying upon congolese government to provide as security. in afghanistan, we've got a questionable partner in the karzai government. that has been difficult. we have a less than credible partner in the congolese government. in afghanistan, we have gone through these stabilization operations as an alternative way to provide security at the local level with the villages, communities, whereby we have been providing some arms and training to the local population there so that they can provide their own security. obviously, the karzai government has been opposed to that. are there any opportunities for any alternative strategies, given the nature of the in theese government any d drc, mr. affleck? >> i will yield to an expert fellow panelist year, but one of the -- the basic issue, and one that will go a long way and that i alluded to earlier, climbing some influence to president -- are applying some influence to president kabila so that p
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 267